symbol of democratic party with american flag in background

This is the second post in a two-part blog series on the U.S. presidential primaries. The first post explores the behaviors and attitudes of Republican voters. This post will focus on Democrats in advance of the Florida Democratic primary.

Much has been made of Democratic candidates’ courting of Latinos, especially with a few key primaries right around the corner (we’re looking at you, Florida). Pundits often seem quick to summarize the presidential candidates’ respective appeal to Hispanics in terms of the candidates’ positions on immigration, alone. Yet this over-simplification might be shortsighted.  

As data-driven marketers, we recognize that a single issue—a single data point—simply cannot provide the level of understanding needed to creating compelling, persuasive, resonant messaging. 

So let’s get to know whom the candidates are fighting over...

Process

Using Neustar’s Market Analytics and Segmentation solution, we created a target group of households likely to identify as Hispanic, and then dug further for insights on those likely to vote in a Democratic primary.

In order learn more about this important group of voters, we investigated their demographics, behaviors, lifestyles, opinions, attitudes, and media consumption using ElementOne’s robust dataset of over 15,000 consumer attributes.

The target populations analyzed, which we’ll refer to as Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter, included U.S. households that are:

  • At least 50% more likely than the average U.S. household to identify as Hispanic
  • More likely than the average to have voted in past primary elections
  • More likely to include registered Democrats and/or registered Independents

But first, a brief caveat: As a Latina born in Puerto Rico but raised in rural Georgia (by a single mother... who was a successful physician), I’ll be the first to emphasize that “Hispanics” are a large and diverse population. The data reflect that fact, since only around 22% of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are likely to identify as of Mexican heritage and 3% identify as Puerto Rican. Which means, of course, that 75% are unlikely to identify as either one. Thus, even though we’ve narrowly focused on “democrat primary voters,” it would be impossible for this short, illustrative analysis to adequately convey their diversity. 

Now on to the data...

Demographics

Compared to the U.S. population as a whole, Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are younger and more likely to have children. Though they have slightly lower household incomes, they are more likely to own homes—specifically in urban areas.

Over 80% of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voters
are likely homeowners.

Income and home ownership are among the biggest demographic differences between Hispanics who have voted in past primaries and those who have not. Over 81% of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households earn an annual household income between $50-$99K, and over 80% are homeowners. This group is also more than twice as likely as the average U.S. household to expect to buy their first home within the next 12 months.

Hispanic Heritage Identification & Language Preferences

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households generally embrace their Hispanic heritage. A higher percentage (almost 18%) state that they have a “high” level of identification with their original culture, versus a “low” level (14%). Over 25% agree that they “enjoy eating traditional Hispanic food,” and almost 14% keep up with Latin music, news, or sports. Yet they are also over twice as likely as the average U.S. household to agree that they “enjoy living American lifestyle/customs.”

The majority (65%) of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households speak only English in the home. Another 11% speak mostly English but some Spanish, and only around 8% of this population prefers to speak primarily Spanish in their homes.

Relatedly, more Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households prefer to listen to “mostly English and some Spanish” radio programs than to “mostly Spanish and some English” (16.2% versus 7%, respectively).

Work & Lifestyle

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are 34% more likely to describe themselves as “workaholics,” and 56% more likely to agree that they want to get to the “very top” in their careers. They are also more likely to agree that they are wiling to give up family time in order to advance in their careers.

Economic Outlook

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households have a relatively positive economic outlook—both for the nation and for their own families. Almost 35% expect the American economy to be better off in the next 12 months (18% higher than the average U.S. households). And they are 20% more likely than the average U.S. household to believe that they will personally be financially better off in the next 12 months (almost 57% agree with this statement).

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households
have a more positive economic outlook.

Attitudes & Opinions

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are relatively content and optimistic. They are 30% less likely than average U.S. households to agree with the statements “I Feel Very Alone in the World” and 26% less likely to believe “There's Little I Can Do to Change My Life.”

One opinion of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households may be of particular interest in the current primary: their beliefs regarding “appropriate” gender roles. Over 13% of this population is likely to agree with the statement “a woman's place is in the home”—which is 51% more likely than the average U.S. household. 

Additionally, almost 29% of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are likely to believe that marijuana should be legalized.

Views on Advertising

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are less likely to avoid advertising. But they are 43% more likely to “expect advertising to be entertaining.” They are less likely than the average household to avoid watching TV commercials—though they are 19% more likely to admit to multitasking while watching TV. They are also over 30% more likely to pay attention to commercials in movie theaters, and notice ads in the lobbies of movie theaters.

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households
expect advertising to be entertaining.

Radio is a reliable medium to reach and influence this important group of voters. They are 22% more likely to listen to the radio every day, more likely to “always” listen to the radio while driving, 20% more likely to rely on radio to keep informed, and more likely to consider radio their main source of entertainment.

Radio is a good medium to reach and influence
Hispanic Democratic Primary Voters.

Geographic Distribution

Perhaps unsurprisingly, California stands out as the single state most likely to include Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households. A map illustrating the likelihood of all states to include this key voter population is provided below.

Florida and Illinois are both among the states whose residents are more likely to be Hispanic Democratic Primary Voters. And Florida and Illinois are particularly notable today, because they are awarding the most delegates of all of the states holding their Democratic primaries on March 15.

Let’s look deeper at a these two key states...

Florida is the biggest prize of the day, with 214 pledged Democratic delegates (excluding superdelegates) awarded proportionally. Miami-Dade and Broward counties have the highest penetration of Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households—at around 13% and 11.5%, respectively. But three of the top four zip codes—where over 25% of the population falls into the Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter targetare in Broward county (zip codes 33319, 33023, and 33009).

Below is a map showing the zip codes where Hispanic Democratic Primary Voters are likely to reside in Florida.

182 Democratic delegates (156 of which are pledged delegates) are up for grabs in Illinois.

A map showing the Illinois zip codes where Hispanic Democratic Primary Voters are likely to reside is shown below.

Interestingly, over 40% of all Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households in Illinois reside in just one county: Cook county. And the city of Hometown, Illiniois (zip code 60456) has the highest penetration; over 30% of Hometown’s residents fall into the Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter target. 

Conclusion

People are multi-faceted. In order to resonate with a particular audience, we must understand who they are—their interests, needs, and desires.

The Hispanic population is an important one, to be sure, but for reasons beyond just their large numbers. The young families that make up the Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter population have a greater incentive to participate in the political process, since they have the means and the desire to establish deep roots in their communities—via home ownership.  

Hispanic Democratic Primary Voters are “workaholics” chasing the American Dream and striving to get to the “very top” in their careers—and are willing to make sacrifices to get there. They are optimistic about their own futures and the future of their country. 

They embrace their Hispanic heritage but “enjoy living American lifestyle/customs.” Though most speak primarily English in their homes, they tune in to both Spanish-language and English-language radio.

Finally, they are open to advertising in general—especially if entertaining—and are heavy radio listeners in particular. From a local media buying perspective, this population provides the opportunity to be very targeted (and thus more efficient), since Hispanic Democratic Primary Voter households are very highly concentrated in a small number of urban areas.

About Neustar’s Market Analytics and Segmentation

Neustar helps marketers identify their most valuable audiences with unparalleled precision, understand their current and potential customers, and ultimately sharpen their marketing strategies for improved ROI.

Using Neustar Market Analytics and Segmentation, marketers can layer any of their internal data against a robust dataset of over 15,000 consumer demographic, psychographic, and behavioral attributes to build an accurate 360-degree view of the market. Empowered by this knowledge, marketers can derive actionable, non-intuitive insights tailored to their unique business needs and beyond the grasp of their competitors.